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Every month, one of our team members will cover
a new, relevant topic related to the CRO & UX world. Follow along and learn how different seemingly insignificant details can change the user experience
for the better and help you boost your sales!
According to CXL, users spend 6.44 seconds viewing the menu. That's how much time you have to guide them to the correct category. Below are tips to help
you do that!
Category navigation
1. List main product categories in the header on the desktop
It will help users reach the products faster, as well as help them quickly understand what your website sells.
2. Sort first-level categories by popularity
This way, users will be able to access the most popular items more quickly. Just check in your web analytics, which categories are getting the most page views & generating the most sales.
3. List product subcategories alphabetically
Sorting subcategories in alphabetical order can help users scan extensive menus much faster.
4. Make the menu sticky on scroll up
As users scroll down, allow them to focus on the content by hiding the menu. Once the scroll-up is detected, bring it back and keep it sticky, as it indicates users are considering changing the content they're exploring.
5. Use distinct category names
When naming your categories, think about the different types of customers visiting the store and then distinguish if the titles are coherent and intuitive for each of them.
Tree testing is an effective method to evaluate whether the menu is well-structured and users
have no issues finding needed products.
6. Organize products by shopping style
Provide users with the option to shop by product style or use case to help them find the correct product selection. For example, a good idea for a kid's apparel website would be to provide an option to shop by age.
7. Highlight relevant promotions
With careful design considerations, a menu is alsоa great place to highlight specific promotions. Put an eye-catching banner on one side of the menu and see how it nudges users to explore the promotion.
8. Include sales and TOP as menu categories
It's a great idea to highlight sales or TOP 10 (or 20, or 100) products on the menu. To make them stand out,use a distinct color such as red.
9. Have visual guides in the menu
As users are browsing subcategories on a desktop menu, the first-level category should be visually highlighted so that users at all times understand which category they have opened.
Try to combine long menus into broad categories
to avoid having an overwhelming number of categories presented all at once.
Include photos in the menu to make it visually more appealing and help users to spot
relevant products sooner.
Include photos in the menu to make it visually more appealing and help users to spot
relevant products sooner.
Anna Ivuškāne
Senior UX Researcher
Anna started her career in the traditional marketing sector but quickly realized her interest in consumer behavior and research.After getting an academic background in market research, she began a deep dive into user behavior analysis online, focusing on user testing and website optimization to deliver the best user experience.
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Meet the team

Olga Kimalana
Head of CRO & UX
Follow along and learn how different seemingly insignificant details can change the user experience for the better and help you boost your sales!
Anna Ivukšāne
Senior UX Researcher
Anna started her career in the traditional marketing sector but quickly realized her interest in consumer behavior and research.
After getting an academic background in market research, she began a deep dive into user behavior analysis online, focusing on user testing and website optimization to deliver the best user experience.
Beate Jirgensone
Senior UX Researcher
Beate is curious about people and their needs; she wants to learn how users think, understand their goals, and figure out why they behave as they do. By running user tests and optimizing websites, she wants to provide the best possible experience for users.
Agnese Čākure
Head of CRO & UX
Agnese enjoys thinking about how different people interact with the same website—what they find useful, what elements are distracting, and what would make their journey quicker and simpler. Previous work experience in the B2B sector has helped her understand the needs of people who use eCommerce for work. The main goal for Agnese is to make the customers feel that their needs are thought of and their time is appreciated.
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